The Failure of Segregated Cultures


America isn’t living up to this Latin phrase. Instead, segregated cultures are encouraged by the political push of multiculturalism. The threats produced by multiculturalism are a consequence of the modern desire to try and make everything equal. It is a logical fallacy to believe that all cultures or ideas are equal. There must be competing ideas for society to be preserved and to progress. Otherwise, society will be destroyed by the most harmful ideas and cultures because they didn’t recognize the inherent threats that come with them. Neither will there be any improvement unless superior ideas can be singled out. In order for society to be preserved it needs to identify which ideas define it and require those ideas to be lived out by its citizens and its immigrants. America has tolerated segregated communities long enough, reacting too cautiously or fearfully to the unacceptable views or practices produced by them. America has cowered in fear too long at the label of white, male, European oppressor by other cultures that did not produce the ideas that founded this country they love to live in. Multiculturalism has failed. Let America now take pride in its roots and its founding. Let America export its ideas and distribute them among the nations that envy our wealth, and show them how they can do the same instead of permitting their ideas to tear us down in the name of equality. America is indeed unequal, because it is better than any other nation in existence. Let the world be changed by its example.

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3 thoughts on “The Failure of Segregated Cultures

  1. Multiculturalism has failed.

    This is too funny!

    It’s funny if it is meant to be taken seriously, but that depends on how one defines ‘multiculturalism’ and how that definition defies pluribus unum. The assumption that there are only these two choices is, of course, a false dichotomy and the the evidence is overwhelming that it is false. For example, in political terms one can clearly see this falsehood when it is compared with the reality that is Canada.

    Canada has come about by a recognition of different but equal (arguable) founding influences. French and English heritages are rooted throughout the country and interspersed everywhere are various First Nations. All three show up in everything from architecture to language, from coast to coast to coast. There is no escaping the effects of one of these pillars everywhere there are people in Canada, regardless if one has been born in Vietnam or Virginia, Angola or Argentina, Ireland or India.

    Not only are these three pillars ubiquitous but within each of these influences are local variations just as influential and different from the stereotypical main as they are from each other. And upon each lies the predominant geography of vastly different ‘awesomeness’ (to borrow from a popular beer commercial).

    Out of these striking differences comes a very powerful sense of unity, a pluribus unum, a national identity apparently based on nothing in common, yet a government and way of life with a longevity of peace and prosperity that is the envy of the world.

    How is this possible if multiculturalism – which is what Canada is in reality – is a failed notion?

    Your dichotomy is false, and that’s why you can neither see nor appreciate the great unifying strength that comes from accepting and, more importantly, celebrating significant differences.. especially cultural differences. Such a failure to see reality for what it is and impose a simplistic and wrong dichotomy on this reality keeps your politics immature and undeveloped and your country afraid to embrace and benefit from the greatest asset any country has, namely, it’s people. When government and its policies, institutions and its agents, fail to truly appreciate and act this fundamental fact, people whose care and consideration becomes the fundamental policy foundation of its governmental institutions, then of course people will begin to blame differences as the root problem because it’s so easy to do.

    But is it true?

    So we thank the US sincerely for its 750,000 immigrants to the Great White North but insist that your childish ideal of one culturally identical people can stick it where the sun don’t shine!

    Why is this good advice?

    Although monoculture in forestry, for example, can look very neat and tidy and easy to maintain, the health of that forest is greatly compromised from the get go because it is so vulnerable to a single parasite or single bacterium. One problem can destroy it in its entirety, whereas we are well aware that a forest’s greatest strength of vitality and its ability to withstand various kinds of assaults comes from the health of its biodiversity. There’s the pluribus unum you have been seeking: the health and welfare of the entirety.

    The examples in nature of the strength through diversity should be evidence enough to any thinking person that your dichotomy not only is but has to be flat out wrong.

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